A year ago, Colorado law changed the requirements for budget ratification for HOAs which were created before July 1, 1992.  Whether your HOA was created before, on or after July 1, 1992, join the Aspen Pitkin County Housing Authority (APCHA) to learn what you need to know about the budget ratification process.  In addition, since

After much debate between interested parties, HB 1212 has passed and is on its way to the Governor in a form that is substantially different than existed on Monday. Rather than recreating Colorado’s manager licensure program, HB 1212 revives prior licensure legislation until September 1, 2020, and creates a stakeholder process to gather information from

Winzenburg, Leff, Purvis and Payne, LLP is pleased to announce the next session of our Warehouse Lecture Series. Register today for the November 30, 2018 classes!

The Series comprises regular half-day sessions, providing four hours of DORA-approved Community Association Manager Continuing Education credits. We are separately seeking CMCA approval for the classes from CAM-ICB.

The

As reported here last month, Colorado House Bill 18-1342 becomes effective July 1, 2018. It was signed by the Governor’s office on June 8, 2018. It requires that all common interest communities, except those in which the declaration contains maximum assessment amounts or limits the increases in the annual budget, follow the process set out in Section 303(4) of CCIOA, which requires that the association’s board of directors adopt the annual budget. Then, within 90 days after adoption of the proposed budget, the board must mail, or otherwise deliver (which may include posting on the association’s website), a summary of the budget to all owners and set a date for a meeting for the owners to consider the budget. The meeting must take place within a reasonable period of time after the mailing or delivery, and in accordance with the association’s bylaws. Notice of the meeting must be provided as required by the bylaws.
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As the title of this post suggests, as of July 1, 2018, there are big changes coming to those communities formed before July 1, 1992. Seemingly out of the blue, our legislature this year decided with little fanfare that it was time to undertake a relatively significant amendment to the budget provisions of the Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act. House Bill 18-1342, which passed out of the legislature and is now sitting on Governor Hickenlooper’s desk (and which is expected to be signed, or in the absence of a veto will automatically become law), requires ALL non-exempt Colorado community associations, with certain limited exceptions, to follow the budget consideration process set forth in CCIOA. The exceptions apply to communities formed before July 1, 1992 where the declaration sets a maximum assessment amount or limits increases in an annual budget to a specific amount and the budget proposed by the executive board does not exceed the maximum amount or limits set in the declaration.
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All the media and legislative talk of construction defect litigation and its impact on condominium construction in Colorado may seem like discussion that does not impact existing communities. But the changes to state and local laws concerning construction defect litigation do affect existing communities by creating owner notice and vote requirements that, in some cases, apply to construction undertaken by associations long after initial development of their communities. The impact of these requirements on communities will likely play out over time as defects occur and associations seek remedies.

While associations cannot unilaterally change the controlling laws, associations can take proactive steps when contracting for new projects. In particular, associations need to know how the potential for construction defects may affect insurance coverage on projects that associations contract to complete on their own. Did you know that many contractors’ insurance policies exclude multi-family housing projects from coverage?


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Many owners in common interest communities might assume that when their association takes steps to increase security – such as installing street lights, security gates, surveillance cameras, etc. – they are providing additional protection to the owners who live in the community. However, the opposite may be true. If a community’s governing documents do not require the association to provide security, the association may be undertaking responsibility where it has none. While security measures are a good idea in principle, community associations must be careful not to unintentionally increase their liability for third party criminal acts.  


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 What is it about community associations that sometimes bring out the worst in people? Is it that we’re dealing with people’s homes? Do we not like somebody else telling us what we can and can’t do? Is there a sense of power from being on the board of directors? The ability to control other people?


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Board members often ask us, “What is the standard of conduct for the board of a common interest community?”  The standard of conduct is known as the Business Judgment Rule.  According to this rule of law, actions taken by directors of a nonprofit corporation in good faith, that are within the powers of the corporation, and that reflect a reasonable and honest exercise of judgment, are valid actions in accordance with the Business Judgment Rule.  Not only does the Business Judgment Rule provide a standard by which directors can measure their conduct, it also provides a legal defense to many claims against the association.


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A managing agent’s duties to the association can arise out of the common law relationship of an agent to a principal, or by virtue of the contractual relationship between the managing agent and the association, or both. In the same manner that the board has a fiduciary duty to the association and its members, the managing agent, as the agent, has a fiduciary duty to the association as the principal in all matters connected with the agency relationship.


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