All the media and legislative talk of construction defect litigation and its impact on condominium construction in Colorado may seem like discussion that does not impact existing communities. But the changes to state and local laws concerning construction defect litigation do affect existing communities by creating owner notice and vote requirements that, in some cases, apply to construction undertaken by associations long after initial development of their communities. The impact of these requirements on communities will likely play out over time as defects occur and associations seek remedies.

While associations cannot unilaterally change the controlling laws, associations can take proactive steps when contracting for new projects. In particular, associations need to know how the potential for construction defects may affect insurance coverage on projects that associations contract to complete on their own. Did you know that many contractors’ insurance policies exclude multi-family housing projects from coverage?


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September is National Preparedness Month. For the past few years, we have  devoted a September post to reminders of preventative steps that can help keep your community safe and prepared for emergencies. By implementing preventative measures now, your association may reduce injury and liability later. The following focus areas may assist your association in identifying how prepared it is for the next emergency:

Review governing documents and insurance policies. Ensure that insurance coverage and reserve funds meet the association’s needs as well as the requirements set forth in the declaration and state statutes. An insurance and maintenance chart and insurance guidelines prepared by the association’s attorney, in consultation with the insurance agent, can serve as one way of notifying owners of their responsibilities. We also recommend that associations check their fidelity coverage and purchase crime coverage to protect against fraud and embezzlement.


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With record rainfalls this season, Colorado community associations and managers have stayed busy responding to reports of water intrusion and hail damage. After the immediate excitement subsides, our phones start ringing. Managers and board members typically ask us some variation of the following questions about insurance:

Is the association or the owner responsible for insurance coverage? This question often arises in the context of condominium and townhome communities, and the answer depends on what the governing documents and controlling statutory provisions say. Often, the documents do not give clear guidance on which party bears the burden for insuring specific components, hence the call to the attorneys. The answers sometimes come as a surprise to uneducated owners and even association boards.

We recommend that associations evaluate insurance obligations with legal counsel and their insurance professionals to ensure proper coverage and to enable clear communication with owners about what coverage applies. Through the preparation of insurance and maintenance charts that summarize association and owner obligations, and the adoption of insurance guidelines that state insurance coverage responsibilities and provide step-by-step procedures for reporting and handling claims, associations can proactively educate owners and reduce confusion when losses occur.


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